About this Site


In my years of studying about Permaculture, I have often been a bit frustrated with the majority of the authors.  They are all living and writing and designing in the tropics and sub-tropics, or are doing amazing things in arid climates.  I plan on living in a temperate climate... where it snows occasionally... where I can't grow bananas!

While there are a few books, and it seems more every year, that touch on Permaculture in a Temperate Climate, many of them are about the general principles of Permaculture.  Few of them get into the weeds, so to speak, of the actual implementation.  I have found bits and pieces of very good information but never a good central clearinghouse for this information.

Permaculture is about design, and it is not about specific, cookie-cutter, one-size-fits-all solutions.  However, sometimes, examples of projects that work, and that I can apply where I live, would be nice.  That is what this website is all about.  Applying Permaculture design principles where I live, or where I plan on living as soon as I get the chance!

As Permaculture is about design, just about anything that deals with gardening, farming, homesteading, and self-sufficiency can be viewed through the lens of Permaculture.  You will find all that here on this site.

One of the things that I am good at is taking a lot of information from a lot of different sources, separating the wheat from the chaff, and condensing that information into an easy to read format.

The main goal I have with this site is to get information that I feel is important in one place for myself and others to read and to reference.  I hope one day to incorporate more hands on material on this site, but for now I want to create as close to a single stop shop as possible for information on Temperate Climate Permaculture.

Hope I can help you on your way as well.



Following is a list of my most popular articles:



Following is a list of my most popular articles on specific plants that grow in a Temperate Climate:


18 comments:

  1. I bumped into your website when researching Good King Henry (how appropriate!) What a delightful and informative site.



    Just wanted to you to know that there are people reading and enjoying your work.



    I live in Canada - mostly Zone 3 hardiness but I've pushed some zone 4 and 5 plants. I am presently exploring herbs - especially native ones. I've just returned from a weekend trip to the boreal forest in Northern Saskatchewan. I would highly recommend the journey - your son's would love it as well. Lots of lakes/fish and the forest holds so many standing people and wonders to explore.



    Thanks again - your work has been appreciated.





    Cheers..



    Susan from Saskatchewan

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    1. Though beauty gives you a weird sense of entitlement, it's rather frightening and threatening to have others ascribe such importance to something you know you're just renting for a while.

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  2. I, too, was wondering why the vast literature on permaculture seemed to be only for exotic or extreme climates, so it was exciting to type in "temperate" + "permaculture" and find another person arrested in their sustainable living development who is studying to return to the land in the most responsible manner.

    Thanks for sharing and making my path a little clearer!

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    1. You produce a great point in your own final paragraph. We couldn’t agree more together with your points. In today’s modern world, your approach to this issue is lacking in today’s kids. We need to ensure that our kids find out more on this topic so we nev

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  3. What a happy accident finding your blog! Linked through from outbackharvest.blogspot.com.au (another one of those arid, extreme-climate-Aussie-blogs ; -) )

    My climate varies between warm temperate and cool subtropical, so I read a bit of everything. I really appreciate the information you have here.

    Cheers,
    Polly

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    1. You can only perceive real beauty in a person as they get older.

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    2. We are learning, too, that the love of beauty is one of Nature's greatest healers.

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  4. Hello, another temperate experiment going on at my place, be interesting to browse your blog and see what you've been up to!

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    1. You can't really say what is beautiful about a place, but the image of the place will remain vividly with you.

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  5. Just wanted to leave a note saying how excited I am to dig into your website. Like many others I found you quite by accident but once I got here, I was immediately engrossed. I am originally from a very warm humid climate but have moved to a much more cold climate that is very unfamiliar for me. Since I am having to learn to garden in a new way I have tried researching books & websites. I love to garden & work towards a more earth friendly lifestyle but a lot of material I keep finding is neither appropriate for my area, or earth friendly. I look forward to reading your materials & hope I can finally find what I've been looking for!

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  6. Thank you so so much for providing such useful information! This is incredible. I really look forward to exploring more.

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  7. Yet another reader who was happy to accidently find your blog! I live in So. Cal. My plum tree died and it was removed today. I learned so many more details about the tree while on your site than any other site I've seen. I just want to thank you for so much more actual useful information than other sites have ever provided. I can't wait to explore the rest of your site and make a wise choice for the replacement tree!

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  8. I found this searching for horseradish. Nice!!!!!

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  9. Thanks for sharing,
    - from temperate Melbourne, Australia.

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